National Register of Historic Places


SUPPORT CAMP DOUGLAS ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation’s historic places that are worthy of preservation. Camp Douglas trained over 40,000 Union Soldiers from Illinois, including some of the first African American Union soldiers, and was also one of the largest prisons holding Confederate prisoners during the war. This was a very significant location during the Civil War, and was a microcosm for the larger social changes that were taking place during the time period.

Camp Douglas, through the work of the Foundation, is an important archeological resource and should be protected.

Site of Camp Douglas with contemporary streets

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

  • What is the National Register of Historic Places?
    • In short, the National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation’s historic places that are deemed worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s national Register of Historic Places is part of a program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archaeological resources.
  • Why does Camp Douglas qualify for a listing when there are no standing structures left?
    • Criteria for listing in the National Register of Historic Places includes:
      • Property associated with events, activities, or developments that were important in the past.
      • Property that has the potential to yield information through archaeological investigation about our past.
  • The Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation and DePaul University have conducted seven archaeological investigations on the area of Camp Douglas between 2012 and 2016, and have found significant Civil War military artifacts from and evidence of the camp, which was the largest military installation in Illinois during the Civil War.
  • Camp Douglas trained over 40,000 Union Soldiers from Illinois, including some of the first African American Union soldiers, and was also one of the largest prisons holding Confederate prisoners during the war. This was a very significant location during the Civil War, and was a microcosm for the larger social changes that were taking place during the time period.
  • What is the result of the listing?
    • Listing in the National Register of Historic Places provides formal recognition of a property’s historical, architectural, or archaeological significance based on national standards used by every state. Results include:
      • Becoming part of the National Register Archives; a public, searchable database that provides a wealth of research information
      • Encouraging preservation of historic resources by documenting a property’s historical significance
      • Offers opportunities for Federal Grants and possible State and Federal tax benefits
      • Network with other historic property owners, tour historic areas, or chat with preservationists through Conferences, Workshops, and Preservation Organizations
  • What does this listing mean to property owners in the listed area?
    • Listing on the National Register of Historic Places places no obligations on private property owners. There are no restrictions on the use, treatment, transfer, or disposition of private property.
    • The listing does not automatically invoke local historic district zoning or local landmark designation, but rather creates and opportunity to showcase the history of the community while still allowing economic progress.
  • Do others support the listing of Camp Douglas?
    • Yes! A significant number of local organizations, historic societies, museums, and community leaders support the listing.
    • Among these are the Bronzeville Community Development Partnership, the Bronzeville Historical Society, the Black Metropolis National Heritage Committee, the Stephen A. Douglas Association, and the Bronzeville Visitor Information Center. A complete list of supporters can be found at CampDouglas.org/National-Register.

 

  • Who is involved in the approval process?
    • The Illinois State Historic Preservation Office receives an application from a sponsoring source; in the case of Camp Douglas, they will receive an application from the Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation (CDRF). After their review and approval, the State of Illinois National Register Review Board reviews the application and makes a recommendation to the National Park Service in Washington, D.C.
  • What can I do to get Camp Douglas listed on the National Register of Historic Places?
    • First of all, thank you for your support! The Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation is preparing an application for listing. It would be most helpful if you could:
      • Indicate your approval with a letter or email to CDRF
      • Respond positively for requests for support from CDRF
      • Respond positively to notices and inquiries from the Illinois State Historic Preservation Office
      • Tell your friends and neighbors about the importance of this historic recognition
  • Where can I get more information on Camp Douglas and the Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation?
  • Is there anything else that I should know about this process?
    • We understand that this information can be confusing, but want to assure you that we have the best interest of both your private property and the historic preservation of Camp Douglas at heart. We love being a part of the vibrant Bronzeville community, and look forward to great things to come in the future. If you have any questions or concerns whatsoever, please contact the Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation at info@campdouglas.org or 312-751-1693.
    • For additional up-to-date information, check out the Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation’s Facebook page at Facebook.com/CampDouglasRF

CONTACT

Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation

info@campdouglas.org

312-751-1693

1368 N. Mohawk / #2S / Chicago, IL 60610

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